The man who met the Báb

The man who met the Báb Some new facts about his life by Brendan McNamara In 1930, Shoghi Effendi asked George Townshend to pen an introduction to a translation he was working on of Nabil’s history of the early days of the Faith, a volume he was planning to publish in the West. The request…

A note from the webmaster

I’ve been somewhat neglectful of the Connections web presence of late. There is some new material in the works which actually arose due to this very site—watch this space. In the meantime, maybe you all would be interested in a video! This is Brendan presenting some work to the Erin-Iran conference at UCC last year….

A visit to Green Acre

by Brendan Mc Namara The Postman Calls Rick Drouin, the postmaster for Eliot in Maine (a small town on the eastern seaboard of the United States) is sitting in my living room, drinking tea. His wife, Nancy, and friends, Paul and Pat are talking about their travels around Ireland and more particularly how they came…

The SS Celtic

by Brendan McNamara Leaving New York “This is my last meeting with you, for now I am on the ship ready to sail away…” Thus ‘Abdu’l-Bahá bade farewell to the Bahá’ís after His extraordinary journey in North America. For almost eight months, the Master had criss-crossed the United States, visited Canada and had concluded one…

‘Abdu’l-Bahá and Cobh

by Brendan McNamara Cobh “There is a reason for everything”, my friend said and I nodded in agreement. I was not feeling so sure, however. I was puzzled. Maybe there is no reason, apparent or mysterious, for some things that happen or things that do not happen. Take for example the connection between ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and…

Joan Waring and Thomas Fforde

Joan Waring and Thomas Fforde by Edwin Graham In the early part of the twentieth century religious diversity was virtually unknown in Ireland. Even in Great Britain there was little evidence of faith communities outside of Christianity and Judaism. The Bahá’í community was only beginning to become established, a process that was greatly boosted with…

The Culvers

Earliest recorded Bahá’ís in Ireland by Brendan Mc Namara This article on the Culver family and their time in Ireland was in New Day, the magazine of the Irish Bahá’í community. Family Background When the Culver family set out from Canada for Queenstown (now Cobh) in August 1906, little did they realise that their four-year stay…

Dr Frederick D’Evelyn

by Iain Palin The basis for these notes on Dr D’Evelyn can be found on Iain Palin’s UK Bahá’í Heritage website, along with the subjects of some of the other essays collected here. Frederick W. D’Evelyn appears to have been the first person of Irish birth to accept the Bahá’í Faith. He was born in Belfast…

Lady Mary

Author of Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia by Brendan Mc Namara The diary that Lady Mary Leonora Woulfe Sheil kept during her sojourn in Persia between the years 1849 and 1852, Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia, has long been renowned for its contribution towards understanding Persian society during those turbulent years.1…

Dr William Cormick

by Vincent Flannery Vincent’s essay on Dr Cormick was first published in Solas, the Irish Bahá’í studies review. John and William Cormick On the borders of Counties Kilkenny and Tipperary in South East Ireland, at the ancient Ahenny monastery, stand two ringed High Crosses (in the north and south of the site), symbols of that…

Foreword

This is the foreword from the book, contributed by Professor Seosamh Watson, who has kindly given permission for it to be included here. The desire to enquire into one’s origins is surely a true sign of maturity in life. It is certainly the case with families: with the children growing or grown there is a sense of…

Beginnings…

This is the first post on this site, and serves as an introduction to Connections and to whatever else comes to be posted here. A couple of years ago, I published a small volume of essays and notes on early links between the Bahá’í Faith and Ireland, titled Connections. The book consists of eight chapters…